Damascus Steel Oryx "Highly Commended" at David Shepherd's Wildlife Artist of the Year

About


BACKGROUND

Stephen Rew is a British artist recently returned to his home-town on the Gower Peninsula, Wales. His early illustrative career began in 2008 when he completed an arts degree at Swansea University. In between his studies he spent time studying animals in the wild in India, the Middle East and Africa's Kwa-Zulu Natal and it was there, in Africa, that long-term objectives to combine work with his love and respect for wildlife manifested.

Stephen is creative yet practical and his success with his artworks lies in his ability to be broadminded with his tools, palette and concepts. His early-career coffee and ink paintings are a huge success and in 2015 he was awarded the Diana Brookes Prize at the annual Art for Youth exhibition in London. 

His work is sought after throughout the UK and Channel Islands, where he formerly lived with his photographer wife, and his paintings and bronze sculptures have been shortlisted for three consecutive years for David Shepherd's Wildlife Artist of the Year competition. 

In addition to his coffee and ink paintings, which are very much his signature style, Stephen has recently begun exploring the world of resin with a new series entitled "Sea". It is an exciting offshoot for Stephen and these works are large, tough physically, yet delicate and intimate to create. It is a new line that has already been snapped up by collectors across the UK, where the original commission originated.

Stephen has a busy creative life both in and out of his studio in Wales, time spent studying animals in the wild and working in his workshops. View behind-the-scenes goings on his Gallery page to follow his creative processes start to finish.

CASTING PROCESS

The original sculpture is made from clay after which a wax reproduction is created. The wax is replaced by molten bronze to create an everlasting sculpture. Bronze sculpting is also known as the lost wax method. It is a many-stage process that is labour-intensive and time-consuming.